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Jess Swanson
Jess Swanson
Jun 2020

A remote getaway to a cabin in the woods can connect guests to the no-frills atmosphere of the sprawling American frontier. And as the birthplace of at least seven U.S. presidents (from Lincoln to Buchanan), log cabins also reaffirm that greatness often sprouts from the humble act of notching together two logs for shelter (splinters and all). For Log Cabin Day (June 28), we round up eight wooden hideaways you can visit to celebrate like it’s 1899.

Boyd Mountain log cabin / Courtesy image

Boyd Mountain Log Cabins & Tree Farm
Waynesville, North Carolina
Nestled in the Great Smoky Mountains 35 miles west of Asheville, this 130-acre property boasts meticulous rows of Fraser-fir Christmas trees, fishing ponds and hiking trails. However, the biggest attractions are the seven hand-hewn log cabins dating back 200 years, which have been transplanted from around the region.
boydmountain.com

Interior of Big Cedar Lodge cabin / Courtesy image

Big Cedar Lodge
Ridgedale, Missouri
Conservationist and Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris opened this remote resort on Table Rock Lake just ten miles south of Branson in 1988. Located 30 minutes from Morris’ first bait shop, its 81 cabins offer an easy yet comfortable escape with vaulted ceilings, wood-burning fireplaces and hot tubs.
bigcedar.com

Ocean view from Big Sur's Post Ranch Inn / Courtesy image

Post Ranch Inn
Big Sur, California
Perched 1,200 feet above the shore on jagged cliffs just 35 miles south of Monterey, this adults-only retreat is a collection of cabins paneled in redwood salvaged from old wine barrels. Featuring wood-burning fireplaces and private decks with views of the ocean or mountains, the property is powered by solar panels and offers complimentary use of its Lexus hybrids—but proudly has no alarm clocks or televisions.
postranchinn.com

Lake Kora cabins / Courtesy image

Lake Kora
Upstate New York
Designed in 1898 for the then-Lieutenant Governor of New York, Timothy Woodruff, Lake Kora is one of the remaining historic Great Camps of the Adirondack Mountains from the latter half of the 19th century. Seven historic structures house 12 guest rooms where everything from the handrails to the flooring to the furniture is made of wood. Though set on a pristine lake about 130 miles northwest of Albany, the property doesn’t make its guests rough it—instead, it boasts pastel sunsets, deer sightings and gorgeously plated meals.
lakekora.com

Interior of El Capitan Canyon cabin / Courtesy image

El Capitan Canyon
Santa Barbara, California
Though just 15 minutes north of Santa Barbara, this resort is nestled in a historic grove of oak and sycamore trees wedged between the Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. The cedar-lined cabins boast vaulted ceilings and French doors that open onto a babbling brook that winds throughout the property. Down-filled comforters, individual fire pits and well-stocked bars make the stay extra cozy.
elcapitancanyon.com

Dunton Hot Springs cabin / Courtesy image

Dunton Hot Springs
Dunton, Colorado
As miners flocked to Colorado in the late 1880s, the Roscio family built a handful of log cabins for workers to rent, charging an additional nickel for them to steep in their hot springs. Over the next century, the property saw little in the way of modern technology: In the 1970s, it cost just $5 to $25 a night to rent the cabins, which lacked air conditioning and were teeming with skunks. Though some of the original structures have been restored and are still standing, the property has been extensively redesigned with newer hand-built log cabins and is considered one of the top luxury resorts in the West, about 150 miles north of Grand Junction.
duntondestinations.com

Exterior of Brush Creek Ranch cabin / Courtesy image

Brush Creek Ranch
Saratoga, Wyoming
Set on a 30,000-acre working cattle ranch in the Wyoming wilderness, this luxury dude ranch offers nine historically restored two- and three-bedroom log cabins with sweeping views of the North Platte River Valley. The cabins are the epitome of rustic charm with hand-hewn log walls, fireplaces and views of the surrounding horse pastures and rolling hills.
brushcreekranch.com

Exterior of cabin at The Ranch at Rock Creek / Courtesy image

The Ranch at Rock Creek
Philipsburg, Montana
About two hours east of Bozeman in the rugged Montana wilderness among moose, elk, wolves and bighorn sheep, this working cattle ranch embraces the Western way of life with fly fishing and horseback riding. In addition to suites at the lodge, the property also offers nine log homes—some two-story with a 12-guest capacity, others especially cozy with only a single bed—that are designed with antiques and Western textiles and art.
theranchatrockcreek.com

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